On Sunday, March 12, Pancrase returned to Differ Ariake in Tokyo, Japan for Pancrase 285.

In the evening’s main event, former UFC fighters collided when Japan’s Issei Tamura tangled with Argentina’s Nazareno Malegarie for the featherweight King of Pancrase title. Malegarie had won four straight since getting cut by the UFC including wins over former DREAM champion Hiroyuki Takaya and Pancrase mainstay Guy DeLumeau. Tamura won the interim title when he defeated Japanese prospect Juntaro Ushiku at Pancrase 277.

In the night’s co-main event, former two-division Shooto world champion Mamoru Yamaguchi fought current flyweight King of Pancrase and former Shooto world champion Ryuichi Miki. A legend of Japanese MMA, Yamaguchi reigned as one of the best flyweights in the world long before the UFC ever added the division. Yamaguchi wa on a two fight winning streak leading into the contest. Miki had his three-fight win streak snapped when he dropped a non-title affair against Takahiro Furumaki in his most recent outing.

The event aired live at 1 a.m. ET on UFC Fight Pass.

FULL RESULTS
Nazareno Malegarie def. Issei Tamura by submission (rear-naked choke). Round 1, 2:40 – for featherweight title
Mamoru Yamaguchi def. Ryuichi Miki by split decision (48-47, 48-47, 47-48) – for flyweight title
Masakatsu Ueda def. Victor Henry by unanimous decision (29-28 x 3)
Senzo Ikeda def. Tateki Matsuda by unanimous decision (29-28 x 3)
Miura Ayaka def. Magdaléna Šormová by unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
Takaaki Nara def. Yuki Kondo by unanimous decision (30-27 x 3)
Yuya Wakamatsu def. Yuki Ueshima by TKO (ground and pound). Round 1, 2:49
Toshinori Tsunemura def. Daiki Gojima by unanimous decision (29-28, 30-27, 29-28)
Hiroyuki Oshiro def. Masaya Takita by unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28, 30-27)
Hiroaki Ijima def. Suguru Hayasaka by unanimous decision (30-27, 30-27, 29-28)
Kazushi Sugiyama def. Satoshi Inaba by unanimous decision (29-28 x 3)

About The Author

Zach Aittama
Staff Writer

Zach Aittama became a fan of martial arts at an early age. Hooked on the sport after one experience, Zach started training Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai as a teenager. Watching the sport only increased his interest, building a fascination for combat sports around the globe. Years of training and two amateur bouts later, Zach continues to train while working and attending school. Zach started writing for Fight Sport Asia in 2014 and joined the Combat Press staff in July of 2015.

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